Stand in the wild

I don’t love to obsess about the tenths of grams in recipes or worry over liquid measuring versus dry measure. I’d rather cook quickly than precisely. Raising kids on a single income also meant improvising with what I had available on hand. So I substitute and wing it rather than fret. I am a believer that stress ruins more meals than procedure or ingredients. I use recipes, but now that I cook less often for fewer people, I realize my recipes were subconscious through repetition, more than intuition, like I previously believed. I say this because things I used to make without a thought will flop half the time now, unless I pull out notes and double check. Fortunately, I click to continue reading…

No thanks, I’m full

I’m leaving for California today, and traveling this week, so I didn’t have time to record the post. Someone I love asked me if my morality lived inside me or if it was externally mandated. We were circling whether humanity had an innate sense of right and wrong—because sometimes it doesn’t seem that way. I think he leaned toward “yes,” so there was no excuse for pillaging the earth, the animals and your neighbor. But I waver. You never have to teach a child selfishness. You teach them what is allowed in your house. Most childhood choices toward morality are because of fear of punishment or in search of praise from guardians. Later, the same motivation comes from school, employers click to continue reading…

Making time for intimacy

I’m trying to practice the rhythm of consistency, but sometimes it’s not possible. Last week’s blog was quarantined as non-essential and stayed inside. Rhythm There are people in my life whom I love but no longer share a rhythm of relationship with. Some are friends who used to visit regularly, others are out-of-state family with separate lives. It can feel like we start again right where we left off, but unless it’s one of those rare connections, we spend our time on updates during occasional visits. Checking in is fine for some connections, though. We need to be willing for friend and family relationships to morph as need and availability changes. It isn’t necessary to have everyone you’ve ever met, click to continue reading…

A sojourner’s home is in heaven

We’ve been traveling, so I missed last week’s post. Today’s is late, and I didn’t record the audio this week either. We were camping last week and the weekend before we visited Hailey, ID with friends. The guys rode their motorcycles and took a scenic route while my girlfriend and I drove a car and brought mountain bikes. I loved the little town, and it made me miss living in Lake Tahoe. But there are drawbacks to living in a resort town. Sometimes the part-timers act like they have more claim on the area than the locals. People who work and support many of the scenic Idaho towns can’t afford to live there since the mass exodus during the pandemic. click to continue reading…

Oh, the molehills I’ve died upon

  I remember when I first heard about the difference between Calvinism and Arminianism. It was a season of spiritual growth. I was a young mom seeking to know God for the first time even though I had technically asked him “into my heart” ten years earlier. The pastor presented both positions in a good light and said that our flavor of Christianity (Calvary Chapel) landed on a mixture of the two. A handful of years later, when I had space from baby-making and time to look things up on the internet, I began to hunger for more knowledge and details about my faith. Our community and many of our friends were LDS, and that prompted me to seek confirmation click to continue reading…