Staying and Fixing Broken

Years ago I read Chasing the Dragon by Jackie Pullinger. I don’t remember why I picked it up, although I did think I’d someday go to a foreign mission field, so I read one or two books about those experiences. One of most impactful things I got from this book was that sometimes the drug addicted would come to her for help, pray to God and immediately be sober, clear minded, healed, and never crave drugs again. Other times the individual would pray, and then writhe in agony for days, crying out for relief from the pain of detox. And both would love Jesus… Only part of the story When people share their experience, we tend to think it’s formula. click to continue reading…

Did I just say that out loud to myself?

Years ago I had a misadventure with a crown on my tooth. You never want to hear a dentist say, “Oops,” when he has the knuckles of both hands inside your mouth. I originally attributed my respect for the dentist who finally fixed my tooth to his professional courtesy. (He’s still my dentist.) I often wondered if competent or secure people just aren’t threatened and don’t need to point out lack in others. I wouldn’t know. Heather Thomson Day writes in It’s Not Your Turn, about a communication concept where maligning another person transfers those traits back on to you in your listener’s mind. She says the stress hormones created during negative talk increases anxiety and irritability (in both you click to continue reading…